BasketMakers.com - A comprehensive informational site for basketmakers, basket artists, vendors of basketmaking materials and all others interested in the art of basket weaving.
Home ] Chat ] Events ] Features ] Forum ] Free Patterns ] Links ] Search ]

 

Topics

Home
What's New
Shop
Arts & Crafts Deals
A - Z
Art Basketry
Basketmakers
Basketry Events
Beginners
Business
By Location
By Region or Culture
By Material
By Technique
By Type
Collecting Baskets
Daily Page
Freebies
Fun & Games
General Interest
Gifts
Graphics
History
Holidays/Seasons
How to's
Naturals
News
Organizations
Patterns
Product Reviews
Publications
Spoke 'n Weaver
Suppliers
Supplies
Tips & Tutorials
Virtual Community
Where To Learn
Where To See
Wholesale

BasketMakers.com is funded solely by donations, ads and affiliate income and is maintained by the volunteer hours of its owner.

Thank you to those who support this site.

Daily Crafting Deals



 

Design products like t-shirts, sweatshirts, tote bags, mugs and mouse pads with your baskets on them. Copyright  Susi Nuss
 

 

 

How to Harvest Red Osier Dogwood For Basketmaking
By Susi Nuss

Red Osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea) is prized by basketweavers for the bright burgundy-red bark of its branches. The shrub grows abundantly in hedgerows as well as in cultivated landscapes and can be harvested for use as a weaving element.

Difficulty Level: Average    Time Required: 90 minutes


Here's How:

  1. Locate a patch of Red Osier Dogwood bushes either on your property or on the land of someone who has granted you permission to harvest.
  2. Dress warmly and wear waterproof boots because wild stands of dogwood often grow in swampy areas.
  3. Cut the branches in late Fall or Winter when the sap is down and the bark is its brightest.
  4. Prune the branch at the base to encourage new growth from the base of the clump.
  5. Cut both new branches of one year's growth and older branches as well.
  6. Be conscious not to take more from the stand than is environmentally responsible.
  7. Gather the branches and bind them with twine to make them easier to carry.
  8. Sort and grade the branches by size and quality before storing.
  9. The branches may be used without soaking for a few weeks.
  10. Store in a cool, shady spot so they don't dry out too quickly, but guard against mold.
  11. Branches may be dried and later soaked just long enough to become pliable before use.
  12. Once soaked, wrap in a moist towel to mellow.
  13. Use the weavers as you would in any other round work technique such as willow.
  14. Thank the plant for giving of itself for your project.

Tips:

  1. Use sharp pruning shears and cut on an angle with an outward facing bud scale just below the cut.
  2. Cutting the branches down to the ground encourages straight new growth the next year.
  3. Heavier branches can be reserved for use as framework in ribbed baskets or handles in others

Related Information:


More
Basketry How To's


Books

Wicker Basketry by Flo Hoppe
Basketry Books

Auctions


Basketry

Splint Baskets

Pine Needle

1800-1934
Native American

1935-Now
Native American

Primitive Baskets

Basketry Books


Gourd Basket Supplies

 

Search

Search this site

Susi Nuss - Editor - BasketMakers Copyright  Susi Nuss All rights reserved
Susi Nuss - Editor
Copyright
Susi Nuss

Link to us

About us
Feed Help
Privacy Policy
Support this site
 


Site Hosted By
Copyright  Susan Roberts, Wind Dancer Consultants - Used with permission



www.flickr.com
BasketMakers' items tagged with Mobilia More of BasketMakers' stuff tagged with Mobilia