BasketMakers.com - A comprehensive informational site for basketmakers, basket artists, vendors of basketmaking materials and all others interested in the art of basket weaving.
Home ] Chat ] Events ] Features ] Forum ] Free Patterns ] Links ] Search ]

 

Topics

Home
What's New
Shop
Arts & Crafts Deals
A - Z
Art Basketry
Basketmakers
Basketry Events
Beginners
Business
By Location
By Region or Culture
By Material
By Technique
By Type
Collecting Baskets
Daily Page
Freebies
Fun & Games
General Interest
Gifts
Graphics
History
Holidays/Seasons
How to's
Naturals
News
Organizations
Patterns
Product Reviews
Publications
Spoke 'n Weaver
Suppliers
Supplies
Tips & Tutorials
Virtual Community
Where To Learn
Where To See
Wholesale

BasketMakers.com is funded solely by donations, ads and affiliate income and is maintained by the volunteer hours of its owner.

Thank you to those who support this site.

Daily Crafting Deals



 

Design products like t-shirts, sweatshirts, tote bags, mugs and mouse pads with your baskets on them. Copyright © Susi Nuss
 

 

 

How to Work With Black Ash Woodsplint
By Susi Nuss

Splint from the Black Ash tree (Fraxinus nigra) is a popular basketry woodsplint material. When weaving with black ash woodsplint, you should keep the following things in mind.

Difficulty Level: Average    Time Required: Variable


Here's How:

  1. Black ash splint is a wood product and as such will have inherent qualities that will need consideration, including grain.
  2. Run your hand along the length of each splint to check for defects before using.
  3. Routinely grade out all but the most minor of defects.
  4. Determine which side you want to show to the outside of the basket. Double satin black ash splint does not have a bad side.
  5. Most weavers will not require thinning down (grading) when two overlap at joins. Thin when necessary, so that the two layers do not create a noticeable bulge.
  6. When you start a new weaver, overlap both old and new weaver over at least a spoke count of 4 and conceal the ends.
  7. The splint should be worked moist enough to remain flexible, but keep in mind that the splint swells on its width when wet, so that the wetter you have it, the more it will shrink up as it dries.
  8. Allow yourself enough time for the weaving to dry thoroughly before turning down and tucking the spokes, so that shrinkage will not cause problems


Tips:

  1. Black Ash is also called Brown Ash, hoop ash, swamp ash, water ash, basket ash, wikp (Maliseet), Wiskoq (Micmac) and FrÍne noir (Que).
  2. Black Ash woodsplint has a beautiful satiny sheen that requires no other finish than careful handling of the finished basket.

Related Information:


Books

Wicker Basketry by Flo Hoppe
Basketry Books

Auctions


Basketry

Splint Baskets

Pine Needle

1800-1934
Native American

1935-Now
Native American

Primitive Baskets

Basketry Books


Gourd Basket Supplies

 

Search

Search this site

Susi Nuss - Editor - BasketMakers Copyright © Susi Nuss All rights reserved
Susi Nuss - Editor
Copyright ©
Susi Nuss

Link to us

About us
Feed Help
Privacy Policy
Support this site
 


Site Hosted By
Copyright © Susan Roberts, Wind Dancer Consultants - Used with permission



www.flickr.com
BasketMakers' items tagged with Mobilia More of BasketMakers' stuff tagged with Mobilia